Faith in Action Blog

Faith in Action Blog

Rev. Jonathan Perrotta (’95)Rev. Jonathan Perrotta (’95)Four years after his ordination as a priest in the Diocese of Lansing, Michigan, Rev. Jonathan Perrotta (’95) has been named the pastor of not one, but two parishes.

As of July 1, Fr. Perrotta is the pastor of St. Mary Parish in Durand and St. Joseph Parish in Gaines. His new positions come after four years at Holy Family Parish in Grand Blanc, where he began as the parochial vicar before being named the parish’s administrator in 2014.

Fr. Perrotta sees the hand of Providence at work in his being reassigned from a parish named for the Holy Family to churches that fall under the patronage of St. Joseph and the Blessed Virgin Mother. “I have to share with you the blessing I felt when I realized that God is still keeping me under the protection of the Holy Family,” the pastor wrote in a letter to his new parishioners. “This special protection and guidance of the Holy Family started before coming to Holy Family parish, and now, it continues as I will be shepherding us at St. Mary’s and St. Joseph’s under the guidance of the Holy Spirit and the One Shepherd. God is good.”

An audio archive of Fr. Perrotta’s homilies is available via the St. Mary’s website.


Cara Buskmiller (’11)“Consecrated virginity is lived in the world, which fits my desire to serve and to heal in corporal works of mercy,” says Cara Buskmiller (’11).

On June 20 Miss Buskmiller embraced that vocation by making perpetual vows as a diocesan consecrated virgin before the Most Rev. Doug Deshotel, Auxiliary Bishop of Dallas, at the Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe. Shortly thereafter, she began her residency in obstetrics and gynecology at the St. Louis University School of Medicine

“The residents together cover all the women’s services in the hospital, from cancer surgery to labor and delivery,” she writes. “Right now, I’m working nights, which means I’m on call every night for patients staying in the hospital, and covering our six-bed women’s ER.”

In a recent interview with Patheos.com, Miss Buskmiller explains that her calling to consecrated virginity was in keeping with her desire “to live radically, completely at the disposal of others, especially my family and patients.” Hers is “a bridal vocation, which fits my desire to be in love, to belong to Someone, and to be deeply known. At the same time, it is a quiet vocation: I will wear no habit except a ring. It is a maternal vocation, which fits my desire to carry souls, in imitation of Mary.”

As an aspiring obstetrician and gynecologist, Miss Buskmiller plans to serve the needs of women and children in accordance with Church teaching and in recognition of the innate dignity of all in her care. “Practically speaking, living faithfully as an OB/GYN means that I do not prescribe contraceptives, provide primary sterilization, or participate in abortions,” Miss Buskmiller says. “It further means that I get to offer women fertility awareness and natural family planning, which get more exciting with every paper that comes out about their good effects.”

Yet she is not concerned about the potential difficulties of maintaining a faithfully Catholic practice in a society that is often hostile to the culture of life. “Even in a largely pro-choice culture, integrating faith in my career is not the hardest struggle I have,” she notes. “That distinction goes to integrating faith with myself. … I want to be full of faith, hope, and courage to live as if God existed, as if sin was worse than death, and as if I was destined to be a great saint with an unrepeatable mission. If I can do that, integrating my faith and my career is no problem: I just drive to work.”

Related:


Grace Kelly (’12)Grace Kelly (’12)
Photo: Santa Paula Times
Just three years after her graduation from Thomas Aquinas College, Grace Kelly (’12) has been named a parochial-school principal in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

A story in the Santa Paula Times reports on Miss Kelly’s new career, which began as a first-grade teacher at Our Lady of Guadalupe School in Oxnard. While teaching, she earned a master’s degree in education at Grand Canyon University and underwent training in the Archdiocese’ Catholic Aspiring Principals Program. “I loved my days of teaching,” she tells the Times, “but all that time I felt a pull that there was something more to do.” Encouraged by her own principal and mentor — fellow alumna Brenna Scanlon (’06) — she applied for, and received, the position at St. Sebastian School in Santa Paula.

Miss Kelly is now responsible for some 150 students and nine teachers at the k-8 school just blocks from her childhood home. Please pray for her as the school begins its new year!


Margaret (Steichen ’84) O’ReillyMargaret (Steichen ’84) O’ReillyA home-schooling mother of 12 children, Margaret (Steichen ’84) O’Reilly has remarkably found time to pen a beautiful essay about the Holy Eucharist in Homiletic and Pastoral Review.

“That the infinite Son of God would give himself entirely to his beloved Church — not just his image or a mere symbol of his love, but his very self, whole and complete — is unfathomable by finite minds,” writes Mrs. O’Reilly, who earned catechetical certification from Our Lady of Peace Pontifical Catechetical Institute in Beaverton, Oregon. “That he would remain forever present to his people in a form that does not overpower us, but that can enter into and transform us, springs from an intellect surpassing all created intellects. It flows from a love surpassing all human love.”

Among the many wonderful insights Mrs. O’Reilly includes in her article is that “the Lord of all creation, who made things as they are, alone has the authority to alter the natural order of created things.” Following His command, “the disciples and their consecrated successors … accomplish the unimaginable.”

The full article, A Divine Reflection: You and the Holy Eucharist, is available via the Homiletic and Pastoral Review website.


A group of seminarians, including Michael Masteller (’13), middle row-left, with the Most Rev. José H. Gomez, Archbishop of Los Angeles
A group of seminarians, including Michael Masteller (’13), middle row-left, with the Most Rev. José H. Gomez, Archbishop of Los Angeles

There are 62 priests among the Thomas Aquinas College alumni, but none yet in the College’s own Archdiocese of Los Angeles. By God’s grace, that will soon change.

On August 8, Michael Masteller (’13) entered the Archdiocese’s St. John’s Seminary in Camarillo. “From the seminary, I can still see Topatopa,” he says of the mountain range that rises above the College’s campus. “I love Thomas Aquinas College. I love California. I love the Church. And all these things meet here.”

Michael Masteller (’13) during his teaching days in Kenosha, WisconsinMichael Masteller (’13) during his teaching days in Kenosha, WisconsinIt was during his time at the College that Mr. Masteller first began to discern seriously his vocation. “Obviously the great access we have to the Sacraments, daily Mass, and confession, as well as always having the Chapel available for prayer, was very helpful,” he says. “The biggest thing for me, though, was that in Bl. Serra Hall we had a group of guys who took our studies and growing in faith very seriously. Two guys were doing holy hours every morning at 6 a.m. in the Guadalupe Chapel, and they invited me to join them. At first I thought I was too busy and turned them down, but then I went once, and it was really good. So I started going every day.”

This daily prayer routine would soon bear good fruit. “That holy hour made me feel God’s love for me and gave me incredible peace. When you feel the love of God in a profound way, it flows out into your friendships with other people and the work that you do. Everything in your life becomes better,” he says. “That experience of being closer to God, of committing to Him, it changed my life. It made me a better person.”

Upon graduating, Mr. Masteller spent two years teaching at a Catholic high school in Wisconsin, during which time he decided to pursue a diocesan vocation. “I was working with these great kids who had lots of potential, but who never really had strong leaders in the Faith,” he recalls. “That experience of really teaching my students, growing with them, walking with them — seeing so many souls at a normal parish who need good guidance — that steered me away from a more contemplative religious community and toward diocesan work. I want to be on the front lines and help the lost sheep come back into the fold.”

He considered entering the seminary for the Archdiocese of Milwaukee, but Providence ultimately led him back to Southern California instead. “There were a lot of good priests out there, and I met with Milwaukee’s vocations director,” Mr. Masteller says. “But when he handed me the application to their seminary, I just knew it wasn’t where I was supposed to be. With a little more prayer, I knew I wanted to come back and minister to the ‘home parish,’ where I grew up and spent most of my life. I want to give the rest of my life to God in the service of this archdiocese.”

Another influence in his return to Los Angeles was the work of his bishop, the Most Rev. José H. Gomez. “A few years ago a friend gave me a copy of the Archbishop’s book Men of Great Heart,” he recalls. “Then Fr. Buckley randomly walked up to me and gave me the same book. ‘OK,’ I thought, ‘people want me to become a priest.’ I put it in on the shelf and never really read it. But later, when I was in Wisconsin, I began to read it, and it gave me courage by showing me the example of other brave men and women who have gone before me and given their lives to Christ. That really helped me to finish my discernment and to enter the seminary. It also gave me a lot of confidence in our bishop, to see how he is both deeply intellectual and passionate about the Faith.”

By virtue of his studies at the College, Mr. Masteller has been exempted from first-year pre-theology classes and now enters the seminary as a second-year student. God willing, his ordination as the first alumnus priest in the archdiocese is just six years away.


Who Designed the Designer

Dr. Michael A. Augros (’92)

Following up on coverage in CatholicCulture.org and the Catholic Answers Live radio program, Who Designed the Designer? — the new book by tutor and alumnus Dr. Michael A. Augros (’92) — is now the subject of a lengthy article in The Tidings. “The battle to prove or refute the existence of God by the New Atheists and the proponents of intelligent design is mostly waged in attack and defense of evidence,” writes Kevin Theriault in the official newspaper of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. By contrast, Mr. Theriault observes, Dr. Augros “takes a non-polemic approach, drawing readers along a reasoned pathway of general principles in order to see God’s handiwork for themselves.”

Mr. Theriault commends Who Designed the Designer? for, beyond demonstrating the existence of a creator, also probing such questions as, “What is this being that exists all by itself? What is the divine mind and how is it different than ours?” As such, the book does much more than offer another salvo in the ongoing battle between atheists and believers. “Most people, it seems to me, don’t have a clear notion of what God is,” the article quotes Dr. Augros as saying. “If you are supposed to love God with your whole heart, soul, and mind, one should be interested in knowing what God is.”

The full story is available via The Tidings’ online publication, Angelus.


Companions by Sir lawrrence Alma-Tadema 1892

Sean Fitzpatrick ('02)“The return of summertime every year often recalls the years that will never return: the golden days of youth,” writes Sean Fitzpatrick (’02). The headmaster of Gregory the Great Academy in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and a regular contributor to Crisis magazine, Mr. Fitzpatrick has opened an online conversation about summertime-reading books that arouse seasonal memories of childhood. “What books,” he asks, “should be brought to lakesides, porches, and hammocks? Which stories provide that return to the perennial glories of summer and the passing glories of childhood?”

His initial suggestions are available in his article, What Are You Reading This Summer?


St. Monica Academy

An education success story comes out of Montrose, California, where St. Monica Academy is relocating — because it has outgrown its original campus in Pasadena.

The K-12 school, founded in 2001 with 44 students, has seen its enrollment swell to 240. As a result, it is moving this summer to the campus of a shuttered parochial school at Holy Redeemer Church, where it will open its doors at the start of the academic year.

There are many ties between St. Monica’s and Thomas Aquinas College, beginning with its headmaster, Marguerite (Ford ’79) Grimm. There are also 10 other alumni on the school’s faculty: Mary Kate Zepeda (’89), Darren Bradley (’98), Alexandra Currie (’05), Paula Grimm (’08), Daniel Selmeczy (’08), Marisela Miranda (’09), Jane Forsyth (’11), Colleen Smith (’11), Thomas Quackenbush (’14), and Thomas Trull (’15). Like the College, St. Monica’s employs a classical curriculum and stresses fidelity to the teaching Church.

“The classical model emphasizes the good, the true and the beautiful,” Mrs. Grimm recently told the Glendale News-Press. “Our curriculum overflows with heroes, beautiful illustrations, moral literature, music, poetry, scripture, math and science.” St. Monica’s is a mainstay on the Cardinal Newman Society’s list of “Schools of Excellence,” a ranking of the top Catholic schools across the United States, which also includes several others that are headed by Thomas Aquinas College alumni.

Notably, St. Monica’s has developed a reputation for athletic excellence, too. The Glendale News Press notes that the school’s sports teams have racked up 22 CIF playoff appearances and 13 league titles. This past year, the women’s basketball squad, coached by Colleen Smith (’11) “won 18 consecutive games, while achieving the fourth-highest team grade-point average out of the 576 schools that are in the CIF Southern Section.”


Who Designed the Designer

Dr. Michael A. Augros (’92)

Having recently been a guest on the Catholic Answers Live radio program, alumnus and tutor Dr. Michael A. Augros (’92) now finds his new book the subject of a review in CatholicCulture.org.

In God the Designer: Yes or No?, Dr. Jeffrey Mirus, president and founder of Trinity Communications, calls Dr. Augros’ Who Designed the Designer? A Rediscovered Path to God’s Existence, “a resounding success” in its effort “to refute the many atheists who, especially in modern times, think they have successfully demolished the traditional arguments for the existence of God based on the necessity of a first cause or a prime mover.” Dr. Mirus adds that Dr. Augros “writes well and uses many entertaining examples, making a potentially dry topic extraordinarily readable.”

The full review is available via CatholicCulture.org.

 

Related:

 


Dr. Michael A. Augros (’92)Taking a break from his work as the director of the College’s 2015 High School Summer Program, alumnus and tutor Dr. Michael A. Augros (’92) recently appeared as a guest on the Catholic Answers Live radio program. There he discussed his new book, which makes a philosophical case for the existence of God, Who Designed the Designer? A Rediscovered Path to God’s Existence. Host Patrick Coffin called the book “a wonder-filled romp through the ‘first cause’ approach of Plato and Aristotle and the great Thomas Aquinas.”

The full program is available, both in streaming and downloadable form, via the Catholic Answers Live website.

Related: